Sunday, July 15, 2018

DENSO awards nearly $1 Million in STEM education grants to colleges

 DENSO, a large automotive supplier of technology and components, constantly searches for ways to increase young people’s access to technical education and help develop tomorrow’s workforce. Aiding this effort, the company’s philanthropic arm – DENSO North America Foundation (DNAF) – has announced it will donate nearly $1 million in overall funding to 25 institutions of higher learning across North America to support science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) educational programming. These grants help achieve DENSO’s goal of exposing students to the rewarding careers available in manufacturing and advance the industry forward by enhancing programs that will produce the next wave of highly-skilled problemsolvers.

DNAF funds will be delivered to programs focused on design, materials management, mechanical and electrical engineering principles, thermodynamics, robotics and more – all intended to help cultivate and encourage a new generation of engineers and skilled workers. “As a global technology and automotive leader, it’s vital for DENSO to advance young people’s education in engineering, technology and other related programs,” says Doug Patton, president of the DENSO North America Foundation and executive vice president of engineering at DENSO International America. “To remain competitive in this ever-evolving, hi-tech landscape calls for a workforce that is skilled, well-trained and able to adapt quickly. We feel great responsibility to prepare students for what’s next – for the health of our industry and their future careers.”

“Manufacturing and automotive companies need technically-minded associates now more than ever,” says David Cole, DENSO North American Foundation board member. “By supporting programs that emphasize STEM learning experiences in real-world settings, we hope to help students explore their passions, find a worthwhile and fulfilling career path, and help our communities prosper.”

DNAF has supported STEM education through grants at colleges and universities since 2001, enabling students to access tools, technology, and experiences that better prepare them for technical careers after graduation. DENSO education grant proposals are invite only and evaluated based on technical merit, student experience, and alignment with industry needs.

This year’s grant recipientsinclude:

Arkansas State University – Jonesboro
California State University Long Beach
California State Polytechnic - Pomona
Cleveland State Community College
CONALEP; Technician National Education
Conestoga College
East Tennessee State University
FIME; Mechanical and Electrical Engineer College
Kettering University
Lawrence Tech University
Michigan State University
Michigan Tech University
North Carolina State
Northeast State Community College
Oakland University
Ohio State University
Pellissippi State Community College
Tennessee Tech University
University of Alabama Tuscaloosa
University of Guelph
University of Michigan Dearborn
University of Tennessee Chattanooga
University of Tennessee Knoxville
West Virginia University
Western Michigan University

DENSO is looking to hire new talent across North America as it continues its pursuit to shape and improve future mobility solutions for all. Positions are available in a variety of roles, business units and locations. Those interested can apply at www.densocareers.com.

DENSO is a global supplier of advanced technology, systems, and components in the areas of thermal, powertrain control, electronics and information, and safety. With its North American headquarters located in Southfield, Michigan, DENSO employs more than 23,000 people at 28 consolidated subsidiaries and 4 affiliates across North American. Of these, 25 are manufacturing facilities located in the United States, Canada, and Mexico. In the United States alone, DENSO employs more than 17,000 people in Alabama, Arkansas, California, Iowa, Georgia, Kentucky, Michigan, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Texas.

Headquartered in Kariya, Aichi prefecture, Japan, DENSO Corp., has more than 220 subsidiaries in 35 countries and regions (including Japan) and employs approximately 170,000 people worldwide. Last fiscal year, DENSO spent 8.8 percent of its global consolidated sales on research and development. For more information, go to www.denso.com or connect with DENSO on Facebook at www.facebook.com/DENSOinNorthAmerica.

Saturday, July 7, 2018

Tata & Howard wins Silver Engineering Excellence Award


The American Council of Engineering Companies of Massachusetts (ACEC/MA) has named engineering firm Tata & Howard as a winner of a 2018 Silver Engineering Excellence Awards for its engineering services on the Long Pond Water Treatment Plant in Falmouth, MA.

Headquartered in Marlborough, MA, Tata & Howard also has offices in Lakeville, MA; Concord, NH; Portland, ME; St. Johnsbury, VT; and Flagstaff, AZ and specializes in water, wastewater, stormwater, and environmental services. The firm was retained by the Town of Falmouth to provide lead engineering services for the design and construction administration of the new 8.4 million gallon per day Long Pond Water Treatment Plant (WTP) in Falmouth.  The new WTP, which replaces an 1890s-era facility that operated under a filtration waiver, provides the town with the ability to meet current regulatory requirements and remove pathogens, taste, odor, organic matter, and algae/algal toxins; produce stable water quality; and provide flexibility to meet uncertain future regulatory and water quality challenges.

“The awards honor this year’s most outstanding engineering accomplishments in Massachusetts,” said ACEC/MA President Michael Scipione, PE president and CEO of Weston & Sampson Engineering. “They are excellent examples of how engineers create projects that improve our lives and communities. Professional engineers are dedicated to providing quality infrastructure, providing safe and reliable water and energy, and making our buildings safe and energy efficient. We congratulate our winners on their exceptional achievements.”

ACEC/MA is the business association of the Massachusetts engineering industry, representing over 120 independent engineering companies engaged in the development of transportation, environmental, industrial, and other infrastructure. Founded in 1960 and headquartered in Boston, MA, ACEC/MA is a member organization of the American Council of Engineering Companies (ACEC) based in Washington, DC. ACEC is a national federation of 51 state and regional organizations. For more information on ACEC/MA, visit their website at www.acecma.org. ACEC/MA is undertaking an awareness campaign to educate the public on the many contributions engineers make in everyday life through their hash tag #EngineeringGoFigure. To Follow us on Twitter:  @ACECMA

Monday, June 25, 2018

Cearns to direct alternative delivery for WSP’s northeast and central regions

 
Denny Cearns has been named director of alternative delivery for the northeast and central regions of WSP USA, formerly WSP | Parsons Brinckerhoff, an engineering and professional services consultancy. Based in the firm’s Washington, D.C. office, Cearns will manage the pursuit and execution of projects using alternative delivery methods covering various markets, including highways, transit and rail, and aviation, drawing on the firm’s extensive experience in alternative project delivery, including design-build and public-private partnerships (P3). Cearns will focus on identifying and applying best practices to improve efficiency, identify and mitigate project risks, and meet cost and schedule objectives.
“Having Denny Cearns join us as part of our alternate delivery team strengthens our focus on delivery and relationships with contractors. We are pleased to have him on our team,” says Fred Tallarico, the firm’s national director of alternative delivery. “Denny’s strong leadership skills are a welcome addition to supplement our efforts and acumen in alternate delivery service with contractors and concessionaires,” adds Bernie McNeilly, chief operating officer of WSP’s U.S. transportation and infrastructure business.
Prior to joining WSP, Cearns served as alternative delivery director for a major professional services firm, responsible for strategic planning and business development, contract development and negotiation, and supervision of project operations. His experience includes managing the firm’s work on one of the largest public works projects in Nevada, which involved improvements to I-15 along the Las Vegas strip. He also served as the design director for the Purple Line Transit P3 Project in Maryland.
A licensed Professional Engineer in the state of Washington, Cearns holds a bachelor’s degree from the University of Washington. He is affiliated with the Design-Build Institute of America.
WSP helps cities, transit authorities, redevelopment agencies, and developers structure alternative delivery transactions, secure federal, state and local public finance resources, and integrate private investment into public infrastructure projects. The firm’s alternative delivery practice provides public sector planning, procurement advisory and contract administration, and private investor advisory services to advance infrastructure development. With its knowledge of the P3 market and the operation and management of infrastructure assets, WSP also provides investor advisory services to buyers or sellers seeking to maximize value with acceptable risk.
WSP USA, formerly WSP | Parsons Brinckerhoff, is the U.S. operating company of WSP, an engineering and professional services firms. Dedicated to serving local communities, we are engineers, planners, technical experts, strategic advisors and construction management professionals. WSP USA designs solutions in the buildings, transportation, energy, water and environment sectors. With more than 7,000 people in 100 offices across the U.S., we partner with our clients to help communities prosper. For more information, visit www.wsp.com

Sunday, June 10, 2018

NCSU researchers improve food bank effectiveness and equity


Researchers at North Carolina State University have developed new computer models to improve the ability of food banks to feed as many people as possible, as equitably as possible, while reducing food waste. Food banks serve as networks, collecting food from many different sources and distributing it to local agencies that then share it with people in need. The researchers, who launched this project eight years ago, quickly realized that there is a great deal of uncertainty in food bank operations. Supply and demand both fluctuate, which researchers anticipated.
“But we found that capacity – the ability of local agencies to collect, transport, store and distribute food – was also variable,” says Julie Ivy, a professor of industrial and systems engineering at NC State and co-author of a paper on the work. “These agencies are often small and rely heavily on volunteers. “Our goal was to develop models that account for uncertainty in a food bank network’s capacity and can help food banks distribute food efficiently and equitably – ensuring all of the regions served by the food bank are treated fairly – while minimizing food waste.”
“Our work here was conducted with the Food Bank of Central and Eastern North Carolina, but these are challenges that are common to most, if not all, food banks, as well as for national food collection and distribution networks, such as Feeding America,” says Irem Sengul Orgut, a former Ph.D. student at NC State and lead author of the paper. Orgut now works for Lenovo.
For this project, the researchers developed two models, which can be used in conjunction with each other. The first model uses historical data to establish ranges of how much capacity each county has. The model then uses those ranges, in conjunction with each county’s needs, to determine how food supplies should be distributed. The second model takes into account each county’s need and capacity – or ability to distribute food in a timely way – to try to feed as many people as possible, as equitably as possible, across counties before the food goes bad.
“Some counties have agencies with more volunteers, more refrigerated storage, or better transportation resources, allowing them to distribute more food before it goes bad,” says Reha Uzsoy, a co-author of the paper and Clifton A. Anderson Distinguished Professor in NC State’s Edward P. Fitts Department of Industrial & Systems Engineering. “But if those counties get all the food, it wouldn’t be equitable – other counties would suffer. The second model aims to find the best possible balance of those two factors.”
“We now have these two models, which are pretty complex,” Ivy says. “We’re currently working with the Los Angeles Regional Food Bank and the Food Bank of Central and Eastern North Carolina to find ways to implement the models that are user friendly for food bank staff and volunteers.”
Specifically, the researchers are working with North Carolina A&T University and a company called Performigence to develop software that can be used to expand these models and put them into use. That work is being done with support from the National Science Foundation, under a grant titled PFI:BIC – Flexible, Equitable, Efficient, and Effective Distribution (FEEED).
“This work is relevant to food banks, broadly, but the fundamental issues are also relevant to disaster relief efforts,” Ivy says. “Really, any situation in which there is a scarce resource, a need for equity, and a robust suite of challenges in distributing the resource. As a result, this may also be of interest to disaster relief researchers.”

Sunday, June 3, 2018

Nine GAI Consultants employees graduate from Point Park University MBA program

In partnership with Point Park University in Pittsburgh, GAI Consultants (GAI) recently graduated its fourth on-site Master of Business Administration (MBA) degree class. The University’s corporate MBA was launched in the fall of 2009, with GAI among the first businesses in the Pittsburgh region to take advantage of the program.
        
GAI’s degree program was designed with employee needs in mind, with course topics and projects related to the firm’s business and industry. The accelerated, fully accredited MBA program is a cornerstone of GAI’s in-house leadership development initiative and is open to all GAI employees who meet the minimum requirements. Point Park University professors teach classes exclusively to GAI employees at the firm’s Pittsburgh office once a week, with telecasting via Skype for Business available for employees at other locations.


The current MBA class includes nine employees from four of the firm’s 25 offices:
o    Pittsburgh-based Todd Wilson, PE, senior project engineer
o    Indianapolis-based Michael Wenning, PE, transportation services director
o    Murrysville-based Alexandria Brunstad, project technical specialist; David Bevilacqua, assistant vice president; and Tim Lonas, project EIT
o    Orlando-based Peter Sechler, PLA, AICP, assistant vice president; Abner Serrano, senior EI; Aimee Shields, PE, senior engineering manager; and Jeffrey Tuell, PE,  engineering manager

Gary DeJidas, PE, MBA, CEO and board chairman, GAI Consultants remarks: “It gives me great pride to celebrate the successful graduation of GAI’s fourth MBA class. This unique partnership with Point Park University affords GAI staff a tremendous opportunity for career growth and personal achievement. Congratulations to each and every graduate for achieving this milestone.”

With offices throughout the eastern and midwestern United States, 60-year-old, GAI Consultants is an employee-owned company that delivers engineering, planning, and environmental expertise to energy, transportation, development, government, and industrial clients worldwide. For more information, visit www.gaiconsultants.com

Friday, May 25, 2018

Identified Technologies releases new drone mapping analytics capabilities

Pittburgh, PA-based Identified Technologies has announced a suite of new drone mapping features and services for its customers in the engineering, construction, energy, and mining sectors. The new features, which will be launched throughout 2018, include:

Haul Road Analysis - Allows the user to incorporate mapped haul roads into the orthomosaic they receive when flying their site by drone. This analysis will cover the slope and width of the road. 

Slope Maps - Enables a user to move a cursor over any point to see the exact slope for that location. It will show slopes by both degree and percent grade.

Plan IQ Camera View - Provides a livestream of what the camera sees when the drone is flying.  This is particularly valuable for maintaining continuous line of sight on the drone as it flies, as required by the FAA regulations.

Change Detection Tool Color Coding - Empowers users to change the colors in this tool so they can color code piles of different things and measure change accordingly.

Enterprise Site Permissions - Gives users more control over shared data, so they can customize the level of access and control they want to grant individual customers, contractors, and stakeholders.

DJI Inspire 2 Drone - Customers will receive upgrades to the new DJI Inspire 2 with their Identified Technologies subscription. The Inspire 2 has enhanced accuracy, robustness and obstacle sense and avoid (SAA) capabilities.




The most dramatic changes to Identified Technologies’ Site IQ software capabilities are the Haul Road Analysis and Slope Map features. For these quickly constructed and heavily trafficked dirt roads, steep slopes result in dramatic increases in gas consumption and costs, accelerated wear and tear on vehicles, or exacerbated hazards from ice and inclement weather.

Going from .02 % to .01% slope doubles the fuel efficiency of the vehicle traveling on it, as it is documented that a 10% change in slope can affect the fuel efficiency by 10%. Given this fuel efficiency, a single large piece of equipment on a less steep slope could save a company $400,000 in fuel over a three-year project.

Identified empowers companies with the ability to track progress on highways, well pads, mines, and landfills in near real-time. Identified’s integrated software and services takes care of everything from FAA compliance and flight planning to advanced analytics. Learn more at www.identifiedtech.com.


Friday, May 11, 2018

RETTEW purchases geophysics company Enviroscan

RETTEW has purchased Enviroscan based in Lancaster, PA. The transaction joins the specialized geophysics services of Enviroscan with RETTEW’s engineering, surveying, and environmental consulting business. Geophysics is the science of detecting and mapping underground or underwater hidden objects and features. Enviroscan specializes in non-destructive, non-intrusive investigations to make digging, drilling, or earthmoving faster, safer, easier, and less expensive. The geophysics services will integrate directly into RETTEW’s existing earth sciences services, which include geotechnical, environmental, water resources, and subsurface utility engineering investigations.

Formed in 1992, Enviroscan is a certified women-owned business enterprise. All employees, including principals and corporate owners, will work from RETTEW’s offices in Manor Township, Lancaster County, PA. Enviroscan will operate as the geophysics service area under the RETTEW brand name.


“This purchase aligns perfectly with RETTEW’s strategic plan and complements our niche technical expertise,” says Mark Lauriello, president and CEO of RETTEW. “The high quality of work and people at Enviroscan are also a good fit with RETTEW’s culture – we’re known for working hard and playing hard, and caring about our communities.”

RETTEW began providing civil engineering and surveying services in 1969. Today the firm has more than 350 employees and 11 offices in Allentown, Conshohocken, Lancaster, Mechanicsburg, Pittsburgh, State College and Williamsport, PA; St. Clairsville and Uniontown, Ohio; Bridgeport, WV; and Denver, CO. For more information, visit www.rettew.com.