Sunday, December 3, 2017

NJIT's Kamalesh Sirkar wins award for Innovation in Membrane Science and Technology


Kamalesh Sirkar, a chemical engineer at New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT), has won the 2017 Alan S. Michaels Award for Innovation in Membrane Science and Technology. Sirkar is known for his innovations in industrial membrane technology used to separate and purify air, water, and waste streams and to improve the quality of manufactured products such as pharmaceuticals, solvents, and nanoparticles. The award, given every three years by the North American Membrane Society (NAMS), is named for Alan Michaels, a pioneer in the field credited with breakthroughs in ultrafiltration technology and major contributions to controlled-release drug delivery systems, among other areas.

In honoring Sirkar, a professor of chemical engineering at NJIT, the membrane society pointed to his “long and distinguished career that has included making fundamental contributions to the field of membrane science and engineering, from membrane fabrication to transport processes and performance of membrane systems, and his lifelong service to the membrane separations community.”

Sirkar holds 31 U.S. patents and three in Canada. He is best known for developing the concept of membrane contactors, a process that permits two phases that do not mix, such as two liquids or a liquid and a gas, to contact each other at the pores of a membrane – without dispersing into each other – to introduce or extract specific compounds across it. The technology is used, for example, to introduce carbon dioxide into beverages, to produce concentrations of oxygen at much less than 1 part per billion in ultrapure water needed for semiconductor production, and to extract valuable pharmaceuticals in aqueous-organic extraction systems, among other separation or purification processes. He also developed a novel membrane distillation technology capable of converting sea and brackish water into potable water with a considerably higher water recovery rate than the standard method, reverse osmosis.

NAMS cited his service to the community, including his “seminal contributions” of two books “that serve as references to the community.” He co-edited with Winston Ho the Membrane Handbook in 1992, considered a standard for membrane separations, and recently wrote the more general Separation of Molecules, Macromolecules and Particles: Principles, Phenomena and Processes in which he integrates membranes with classical chemical engineering processes. He has served on the editorial board of the Journal of Membrane Science since 1989 and is the founding editor-in-chief of “Current Opinion in Chemical Engineering” since 2011.

Sirkar, who was elected to the NAMS board of directors in 1996 and served a one-year term as president beginning in 1998, worked with Michaels, who was also a member of the board. “He was a towering figure in our young membrane community who invented a series of membranes for ultrafiltration-based separation of proteins and macromolecules having different molecular weights,” Sirkar recalled. “That was the second big breakthrough in the field of membrane technology, the first being the Loeb-Sourirajan reverse-osmosis membranes for desalination.” He added, “He appeared to be particularly fond of the membrane solvent extraction technique that I developed. In fact, he published a paper utilizing that technique in 1992.”

Looking back on the evolution of his field, Sirkar pointed to a number of successes in addition to reverse osmosis, desalination, and ultrafiltration, including kidney dialysis, membrane separation of air, natural gas and organic vapors, electrodialysis, and the development of membrane bioreactors for water treatment, among others.

The award consists of a $10,000 prize and lifetime membership in NAMS.

As a public technological university, NJIT is a research university with an enrollment of 11,400 graduate and undergraduate students. NJIT specializes in fields such as solar research, nanotechnology, resilient design, tissue engineering, and cybersecurity. NJIT is among the top U.S. polytechnic public universities in research expenditures, exceeding $130 million, and is among the top 1 percent of public colleges and universities in return on educational investment, according to PayScale.com

Sunday, November 12, 2017

Fluor-led joint venture breaks ground on Maryland Purple Line rail project



Fluor Corporation has announced that the Purple Line Transit Partners joint venture team, consisting of Fluor, Meridiam Infrastructure Purple Line, and Star America Purple Line, have broken ground on the Purple Line Light Rail project for the Maryland Department of Transportation (MDOT) and the Maryland Transit Administration (MTA).

The groundbreaking was capped off with the signing of the U.S. Department of Transportation Federal Transit Administration’s (FTA) Full Funding Grant Agreement (FFGA) of $900 million from its Capital Investment Grant Program. Receiving the FFGA advances a 16-mile new transit option for Maryland residents in one of the most highly congested corridors in the nation.

“Fluor is honored to break ground today on the second transit public-private partnership project in the U.S.,” says Hans Dekker, president of Fluor’s infrastructure business line. “We bring megaproject experience and abilities to design, build, finance, and manage complex projects. Fluor and our partners are currently operating the Denver Eagle P3 commuter rail project, the only other transit P3 in the country, and we look forward to building on its success to deliver the Purple Line.”

Fluor is participating in the entire 36-year life cycle of the $5.6 billion project. Fluor is the managing partner of the design-build team, Purple Line Transit Constructors, consisting of Fluor Enterprises, the Lane Construction Corporation, and Traylor Bros. Following the construction, Purple Line Transit Operators, a Fluor-led team comprising Fluor Enterprises, Alternate Concepts, and CAF USA, will provide 30 years of operations and maintenance services.

Located in the Washington Metropolitan Region, the project includes 21 stations along a 16-mile alignment extending from Bethesda, Maryland, in Montgomery County to New Carrollton, Maryland in Prince George’s County. This new line will provide connections to several existing transit providers and improve mobility to major economic and job centers as well as the University of Maryland in College Park. Passenger service is scheduled to begin in early 2022.
  
Flour Corporation is a global engineering, procurement, fabrication, construction, and maintenance company that designs, builds, and maintains capital-efficient facilities for its clients on six continents. With headquarters in Irving, Texas, Fluor has more than 60,000 employees worldwide. For more information, visit www.fluor.com

Sunday, November 5, 2017

AISES announces new members of board of directors

The American Indian Science and Engineering Society (AISES) has announced the appointment of six new members of its Board of Directors. Joining the AISES board are Grace Bulltail, Kristina Halona, Shaun Tsabetsaye, Adrienne Laverdure, Barney Enos, and Alicia Jacobs.

New members of the AISES Board of Directors include:

Grace Bulltail (general member)

Grace is originally from Crow country in Montana, a member of the Crow Tribe, and a descendant of the Mandan, Hidatsa, and Arikara Tribes of Fort Berthold, North Dakota. Grace received a bachelor of science in civil and environmental engineering from Stanford University. She completed master’s degree programs at Montana Tech and Columbia University. Grace completed a doctoral program in the Department of Biological & Environmental Engineering in the College of Agricultural & Life Sciences at Cornell University. Her dissertation research focuses on water quality impacts from natural resource development in tribal communities. Grace has worked as an engineer developing water resources infrastructure projects prior to starting her doctoral program. She has also served as an engineering instructor at United Tribes Technical College and continues to work as a consulting engineer. She is a recipient of the GEM Foundation Fellowship, Sloan Indigenous Graduate Partnership Fellowship, NSF IGERT Fellowship, and Cornell Colman Fellowship in completing her graduate studies. Grace is currently a California Alliance postdoctoral fellow in the Departments of Earth System Science and Civil Engineering at Stanford University. Grace has participated in AISES programming for the past 22 years and is an AISES Sequoyah Fellow.

Barney “B.J.” Enos (general member)

B.J. is an enrolled member of the Gila River Indian Community and is currently a Council 4 Representative. His roots in AISES started in 1994 when he was a sophomore at Coolidge High School in Coolidge, Arizona.  With a background and undergraduate degree in public health and an advanced degree in public administration, B.J. understands the role AISES plays in supporting the development of skills and capabilities in STEM that will allow Native Americans to learn, grow, and serve their people.

Kristina Halona (general member)

Kristina Halona is a Navajo from Sawmill, Arizona on the Navajo Reservation. She is of the Black Streak Wood People Clan born for the Folded Arms People Clan. The Bitter Water Clan is her maternal grandfather’s clan, and the Salt Clan is her paternal grandfather’s clan. Kristina is an aerospace engineer as a Vehicle Delivery Deputy Lead on the ground-based Midcourse Defense (GMD) Interceptor Program at Orbital ATK in Chandler, Arizona. Kristina received a B.S.E. degree in aerospace engineering from Arizona State University and a M.S.E. degree in engineering management from George Washington University. Kristina has been an AISES member since middle school, when she competed in AISES science fairs, and that led to AISES scholarships, internships, and leadership opportunities. She has served as an AISES national student representative. As a professional and a Sequoyah Fellow, she has been a part of the AISES professional chapters in the Bay Area, Tucson, and Phoenix. She is currently the Phoenix Professional Chapter vice president.

Alicia Jacobs (associate member)

Alicia received a Bachelor of Science Degree in Sociology from Western Carolina University with a concentration in Native American health and is currently working on her Master of Public Affairs degree. She is passionate about building self-reliance in native youth to build stronger native communities. Her experience includes advocating for Native youth on Capitol Hill, a certified Native Life Skills Trainer, an Qualla Education Collaborative member, and first recipient of the AISES Tribal Partner Service Award. Her experience with AISES began eight years ago when her students began attending annual AISES events.  Her passion to increase Native people in STEM is driven by her commitment to effective communication, collaboration, and community. Increasing the workforce development for the enrolled members in Cherokee, North Carolina has been one of her most rewarding achievements. Her passion for empowering youth goes beyond today as she continues to strive towards making a generational impact of strong leaders for this region and across Indian country. Alicia is an AISES Sequoyah Fellow.

Adrienne Laverdure (general member)

Adrienne Laverdure is an enrolled member of the Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa in North Dakota. She is a board-certified family practice physician at the Peter Christensen Health Center for the Lac du Flambeau Band of Lake Superior Chippewa in Wisconsin, serving that community for almost 20 years. Dr. Laverdure graduated from the Indians into Medicine program at the University of North Dakota in the late 1980s, where she was an AISES college chapter member. Dr. Laverdure has helped raise two boys that are both in the medical field - one is a doctor in Tuba City, Arizona and the other a psychologist working for the Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate in South Dakota. Her daughter is currently going to school at the University of Wisconsin in Madison, where Dr. Laverdure volunteers at the Native American Center for Health Professions (NACHIP) program, mentoring and supporting Native STEM students interested in health professions.  Dr. Laverdure is an AISES Sequoyah Fellow.

Shaun Tsabetsaye (general member)

Shaun Tsabetsaye is an enrolled tribal member of the Zuni Pueblo and is an AISES Sequoyah Fellow.  His involvement with AISES began in 1994, and he continues to contribute today as a member of the Corporate Advisory Council.  Shaun has over 13 years of engineering and project management experience.  He is currently at NextEra Energy Resources as a Project Manager of Tribal Renewable Energy Development.  Shaun has earned degrees for Executive Master's of Business Administration and Bachelor's in Electrical Engineering and completed significant work towards a Master's of Engineering in Semiconductors and Electronics Manufacturing.

Sunday, October 1, 2017

Chris Hannum joins Entech's principal leadership team


Entech Engineering recently announced that Christopher Hannum, PE has accepted a position as principal on Entech’s executive leadership team, becoming the seventh member of Entech’s current leadership team. Hannum joined Entech in 2012 and oversees engineering for the firm’s water and wastewater projects.

Chris looks forward to applying his 25 years of work experience to help lead the company: “I was humbled and honored to be offered this opportunity. I’ve been surrounded by many professionals throughout my career, but the way Entech approaches projects and clients and the level of talent in-house is special, and I wanted to further commit myself to fostering this company and our culture and people.”

Company President, Jeff Euclide, PE, says, “Entech is owned by company employees, and we are very selective with the leaders we put in place to become principals. Chris has a superb blend of technical and leadership skills that he adds to our leadership team. He will play an important part as we face new challenges as Entech continues to grow and expand.”

Hannum is a registered professional engineer in the state of Pennsylvania and holds a B.S. in Mechanical Engineering from the Virginia Military Institute and a M.S. in Water Resources and Environmental Engineering from Villanova University. He is also a veteran, having served in the United States Army for 6 years. He has served as an elected director on the Oley Valley School District School Board for the last 12 years.

Based in Reading, Pennsylvania, Entech's engineering, consulting, and architectural teams help clients make more informed decisions as they invest in their facilities and infrastructure. From six offices in Pennsylvania, they employ approximately 100 professionals who serve customers in the municipal, higher education, manufacturing, and oil and natural gas markets. For more information, visit www.entecheng.com.

Monday, September 25, 2017

University of Illinois launches first U.S. nanomanufacturing node

Mechanical engineering professors Placid Ferriera, Kimani Toussaint, Narayana Alura, and Elif Ertekin

University of Illinois researchers have been awarded a 5-year, $4M grant by the National Science Foundation (NSF) to launch the country’s first computational node aimed at developing nanomanufacturing simulation tools. Kimani Toussaint (principle investigator and director), Narayana Aluru (co-PI), Elif Ertekin (co-PI), and  Placid Ferreira (co-PI), all faculty members from the Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering (MechSE) at Illinois, will lead this effort, along with Hayden Taylor (co-PI) from Cal Berkeley.
Having launched September 1, the nanoMFG Node’s mission is to be the engine for design, simulation, planning, and optimization of highly relevant nano-manufacturing growth and patterning processes. “To make nanomanufacturing economically viable, we envision end-users getting onto the nanoHUB cyber platform and simulating every stage in the manufacturing of a nano-enabled product,” Toussaint says. “These simulation tools could save significant time and money while providing valuable insight on how to refine critical process steps in nanomanufacturing.”
Nanomanufacturing critically depends on achieving control over complex process parameters and a thorough understanding of the underlying driving scientific phenomena. To date, there has been a clear absence of open-source simulation tools to help guide precise design and manufacturing of complex nano-scale structures. A 2010 science policy report commissioned by the NSF highlights that multi-scale theory, modeling, and simulation are essential to advancing theory in nanoscience, which will lead to the nanomanufacturing of useful devices and structures.   
According to Toussaint, the nanoMFG Node team plans to develop computational tools that have been validated by experiments by collaborating with many of the facilities and centers at Illinois, including the Materials Research Laboratory and the Micro-Nano-Mechanical Systems Cleanroom Laboratory. They also plan to collaborate with the NCSA for software development and design.
The team aspires to create tools in areas ranging from nanoscale transport phenomena models to nanoscale self-assembly. The tools developed by the node will be validated by experimental data and made available on the nanoHUB, which is the cyber platform for the Network for Computational Nanotechnology (NCN). The NCN’s goals are to: 1) accelerate the transformation of nanoscience to nanotechnology through the integration of simulation with experimentation; 2) engage an ever-larger and more diverse cyber community sharing novel, high-quality nanoscale computation and simulation research and educational resources; 3) develop open-access, open-source software to stimulate data sharing; and 4) inspire and educate the next-generation workforce.  
We are excited to develop high fidelity theory, modeling, and simulation tools that will reduce the lead time to design, fabricate, and scale nano-manufactured products,” Ertekin remarks. “Our goal is to help realize the potential of nanomanufacturing by streamlining the process and making simulation tools widely available to anyone interested in developing a nano-manufactured product.”
The node will have many opportunities for student engagement through summer workshops open to Illinois students as well as students from all over the country. There will also be engagement with industry to keep the tools developed relevant to industry needs.

Friday, September 8, 2017

Rimkus Consulting Group leverages global forensic expertise to form engineering and technical firm

Rimkus Consulting Group, a worldwide provider of forensic consulting services, has announced the strategic expansion of its business operations with the formation of a new company, Rimkus Building Consultants. Headquartered in Houston, Texas, the firm will help clients from coast to coast proactively extend the life of their facilities by helping to identify, mitigate, and eliminate the complex risks inherent in procurement, design, construction and operation of large-scale facilities.

"Rimkus Building Consultants combines our deep bench of technical expertise – engineering, architecture, design, and construction – with our forensic backgrounds to proactively identify those important details that provide for a lasting facility," says Jack Dolan, president of Rimkus Building Consultants. "From building envelopes and structural systems to roadways, bridges, electrical systems and the entire range of built environments, we bring a personalized approach and innovative thinking to our clients to help mitigate risks and defects and maximize life cycles."

With a full-service portfolio and all engineering disciplines under one roof, Rimkus Building Consultants will provide professional consultation and support on a wide range of project-specific issues for both private and public sectors. The firm's suite of services spans the life of the project, including property condition assessments (PCA), risk assessments, design services, pre-construction services, construction services, project close-out and post-construction services, maintenance and operations, as well as building sciences. 

"Rimkus has more than 30 years experience investigating what goes wrong with buildings and projects, and it's a natural next step for us to use this expertise to help developers, building owners, and managers proactively optimize and extend the life of their facilities," says Curtis Brown, president and chief executive officer of Rimkus Consulting Group. "The new company fits well with our overall business strategy and supports our mission to deliver services for every aspect of the built environment."

Rimkus Building Consultants is managed by a team of seasoned experts with deep experience across a diverse range of commercial, industrial and institutional projects. Dolan, the firm's president, has more than 25 years experience in all phases of planning, design and construction for a diverse list of projects, ranging from business parks to large-scale commercial and industrial facilities to multi-family dwellings, as well as bridge, infrastructure and roadway projects. Senior Vice President Peter Doffing also brings 25 years experience in the engineering, construction and insurance sectors to the firm.

Rimkus Building Consultants combines extensive expertise in design, construction, operations and maintenance with more than 30 years of forensic investigations experience gained from Rimkus Consulting Group. For more information, visit www.rimkusbuildingconsultants.com.

Monday, August 21, 2017

DENSO Foundation’s grants support hands-on education at 22 institutions

Supporting the communities DENSO serves and providing resources for the next generation of technical workers to succeed are core to DENSO’s success. To fulfill these promises, DENSO’s philanthropic arm – the DENSO North America Foundation (DNAF) – funds programs across the continent each year, providing hands-on learning opportunities in areas from robotics and thermodynamics to design and materials development. Recently, the DNAF board confirmed its 2017 college and university grants, totalling nearly $1 million in overall funding for 22 institutions and educational programs across North America.

“Innovation throughout the manufacturing industry will continue to produce more growth opportunities for students in skilled trades and technical fields,” says Doug Patton, president of the DENSO North America Foundation and executive vice president of engineering at DENSO International America. “Companies will lean on this young workforce for years to come, and to succeed, we need to empower students by giving a better sense for what they’ll experience in the workplace.”

“The automotive industry relies more and more on those with expertise in fields like robotics and electrical engineering and mechanical engineering,” says David Cole, DENSO North American Foundation board member. “Supporting STEM education enables DENSO to develop the next generation of talent needed to fill these roles. It also helps students find ways to translate their passion and skills into opportunity after graduation.”

Since 2001, the DNAF has advanced the auto industry through grants to colleges and universities, providing students with technology, tools, and experiences similar to that of the professional workplace they’ll experience after graduation. The proposal process for these education grants is invite only, and all proposals are evaluated based on technical merit, student experience, and alignment with industry needs.

This year’s grant recipients include:

Arkansas Northeastern College
Arkansas State University
California State University Long Beach
Cleveland State Community College
CONALEP Technical College
Conestoga College
East Tennessee State University
FIME – Mechanical and Electrical Engineer College
Kettering University
Lawrence Technological University
Michigan State University
Michigan Technological University
North Carolina State University
Northeast State Community College
Oakland University
Tennessee Technological University
Trine University
University of Guelph
University of Kentucky
University of Tennessee – Chattanooga
University of Tennessee – Knoxville
Western Michigan University

A registered 501(c)3 corporate foundation, the DENSO North America Foundation is dedicated to helping students advance their education in engineering, technology, and other related programs. Founded in 2001, the foundation provides grants to colleges and universities throughout North America, helping our communities prosper through the development of a skilled and knowledgeable workforce. The Foundation also provides disaster relief grants through the American Red Cross to aid persons and communities in which DENSO Corporation operates. For more information, visit http://densofoundation.org.

DENSO is a global automotive supplier of advanced technology, systems, and components in the areas of thermal, powertrain control, electronics, and information and safety. With North American headquarters in Southfield, Michigan, DENSO employs more than 23,000 people at 30 consolidated companies and affiliates across North American. Of these, 28 are manufacturing facilities located in the United States, Canada, and Mexico. In the United States alone, DENSO employs more than 17,000 people in Alabama, Arkansas, California, Iowa, Georgia, Kentucky, Michigan, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Tennessee and Texas. For more information, visit www.denso.com/us-ca/en or connect with DENSO on Facebook at www.facebook.com/DENSOinNorthAmerica.

Saturday, August 5, 2017

GAI Consultants names new president

 Anthony Morrocco
 Gary DeJidas

National engineering, planning, and environmental consulting firm GAI Consultants (GAI) recently announced that its board of directors approved a progression of the company’s senior leadership structure. Consistent with the company’s succession planning strategy, GAI veteran Anthony (Tony) Morrocco, MBA, PLS, PE, current executive vice president and chief operating officer (COO), succeeded Gary DeJidas, PE as president. DeJidas continues to serve as chief executive officer (CEO) and chairman of the board.

“Gary’s commitment to employees, corporate culture, customers and shareholders along with his 'one company' vision has defined GAI over his tenure. Under his leadership, GAI has grown substantially and become a financially successful firm that consistently delivers excellent service to its clients. We extend hearty thanks for his continued leadership and his insightful succession planning,” states senior vice president and board member Stephen Gould, MBA.

“Gary and I, along with the senior management team, will continue to collaborate closely over the next few years to ensure a smooth and orderly leadership transition to maintain the success and stability our combined efforts have brought to GAI,” says Morrocco.

“I have worked closely with Tony for most of his career at GAI. I know firsthand that his industry knowledge and expertise with our brand and values, coupled with his strategic vision and operating skills, make him the ideal choice to lead GAI as we look ahead to the future and the next generation of leadership,” says DeJidas.

After joining GAI as a project manager in 1989, Morrocco quickly identified the need for industrial, commercial, and residential land development services. He established GAI’s Land Development and Survey groups and directed their development for several years, winning significant projects that changed Pittsburgh’s skyline. He advanced his career at GAI from group manager and project manager to the position of managing officer of GAI’s Pittsburgh office. During his tenure as office manager, Morrocco engineered the design and construction of additional office space to handle the growth of GAI’s Pittsburgh office from 200+ to 400+ employees. He was promoted to COO in 2009, responsible for overseeing GAI’s business units and providing guidance and direction to GAI’s professional and administrative staff in all offices.

“GAI continues to benefit from Tony's organizational vision and guidance. He has been instrumental in crafting and guiding the development of GAI's current operational structure, during what has been the most productive years in our company’s history. We look forward to carrying forward with the momentum Tony has helped to create and supporting him in his new role,” says senior vice president and board member Greg Nettuno, PE.

Headquartered in Pittsburgh, GAI is an employee-owned engineering, planning, and environmental consulting firm providing local expertise to worldwide clients in the energy, transportation, development, government, and industrial markets. Founded in 1958 by Carnegie Mellon University engineering graduate students, GAI developed a strong professional reputation in foundation engineering by supporting the needs of nationally-recognized industrial and energy clients. In the late 1960s, and in response to urban growth and mounting environmental regulations, GAI diversified into transportation and land development while adding niche services in survey, environmental studies, and cultural resources. Corporate-wide consolidation of strategic acquisitions diversified the firm, which now has offices in several eastern and midwestern states.

Saturday, July 22, 2017

WSP and TTI partner to advance transportation research

WSP USA and the Texas A&M Transportation Institute (TTI) have signed a memorandum of understanding to jointly collaborate on creating a stronger connection between research and deployment of transportation systems management and operations (TSMO) as well as connected and automated vehicle solutions.

The agreement includes sharing expertise on research, transportation operations and management, and connected and automated vehicles. It also encourages educational and mentoring opportunities in which WSP would be involved in Texas A&M engineering class seminars and lectures as well as sponsoring engineering capstone design projects. The agreement also entails opportunities for TTI and Texas A&M engineering students to gain real-world experience on the day-to-day challenges facing leading transportation operations centers.

“TTI and WSP have a long history of collaborating, beginning with the early development of high-occupancy vehicle (HOV) lanes,” says Greg Winfree, TTI agency director. “The staffs of both of our organizations have collaborated on projects all over the country to deploy best practices in planning and design of HOV facilities. We see similar opportunities with next-generation transportation technologies, such as connected and automated vehicles. By working together, we gain efficiencies in moving the most promising technologies from development into implementation.”

With technology increasing at such a rapid rate, transportation solutions need to incorporate technology advances to deliver cost-effective implementation today that will be compatible with the future direction of the transportation industry, according to John Porcari, president of U.S. advisory services at WSP. “We have adapted the capability maturity model to TSMO concepts, and together with TTI are positioned to incorporate connected and automated vehicle components into the existing TSMO efforts for our clients,” he explains. “Collaboration between leading researchers and everyday practitioners will help to better define needs for national and state sponsored research while helping agencies reflect the current state-of-the-practice in their efforts.”

WSP is a leader in the design, deployment, and operation of transportation systems in the United States, including intelligent transportation systems and connected vehicle technology. The firm has been at the forefront of the development and testing of transportation infrastructure for driverless and connected vehicles and is currently advising transportation agencies on the development of infrastructure to accommodate connected, automated, and driverless vehicles.

TTI is involved in transportation operations and technology research and operates a transportation proving grounds for testing research solutions. The Texas A&M proving grounds are a cornerstone of the nationally designated Texas Automated Vehicle Proving Grounds Partnership. The collaboration between WSP and TTI will expedite deploying proven research to transportation operating agencies and enhance the education and training of future transportation professionals.

WSP USA, formerly WSP | Parsons Brinckerhoff, is the U.S. operating company of a worldwide engineering and professional services firms—WSP. Dedicated to serving local communities, we are engineers, planners, technical experts, strategic advisors and construction management professionals. WSP USA designs solutions in the buildings, transportation, energy, water, and environment sectors. We have nearly 7,000 employees in 100 offices across the U.S. For more information, visit www.wsp.com

The Texas A&M Transportation Institute develops solutions to the problems and challenges facing all modes of transportation. The Institute conducts over 700 research projects annually with over 200 sponsors at all levels of government and the private sector. In the laboratory and the classroom, TTI researchers help prepare students for transportation careers. Recognized as a higher education-affiliated transportation research agencies, TTI’s research and development program has resulted in significant breakthroughs across all facets of the transportation system. For more information, visit http://tti.tamu.edu

Friday, July 14, 2017

Thomson Industries collaborates with research team to develop new Tesla coil designs

Thomson Industries, a manufacturer of mechanical motion control solutions, has donated a high-precision ball screw assembly to The Geek Group National Science Institute in Grand Rapids, Michigan, to help develop revolutionary designs of Tesla Coils (TC). An ambitious R&D program has been initiated there to discover new uses for the TC with help from a new automated process for winding coils.

Thomson was selected because of their application engineering support and breadth of product offerings, which enabled delivery of an optimal complete ball screw assembly. That Thomson ball screw assembly will help The Geek Group’s high-energy engineering team convert from typical manual winding to a much faster, more accurate automated process for winding thousands of coils required to conduct their experiments.










A Thomson customer support engineer guided The Geek Group engineering team in selecting the exact configuration to best match their needs. The product selected was a quick-install ball screw assembly that avoids any precision problems that may result from assembling components on site. The final configuration consisted of a Thomson FSI Style ball nut along with an eight-foot-long ball screw just under an inch in diameter.

“We set our IRC team on the task of finding the best linear motion technology in the industry,” says Chris Boden, CEO of The Geek Group. “The team, composed of a couple hundred experts from many science and technology disciplines, analyzed about a dozen different products and concluded that only the Thomson drive could do exactly what we needed and exactly how we wanted to do it.”
The TC production program has already begun, and The Geek Group has plans for experimenting with larger coils in the future.

With more than 70 years in the motion control industry, Thomson produces linear ball bushing bearings, profile rail bearings, shafting, ground and rolled ball screws, linear actuators, gearheads, clutches, brakes, linear systems, and related accessories. Thomson invented the linear ball bushing bearing in 1945 and now serves global commercial, aerospace, and defense markets. Based in Radford, Virginia, Thomson has facilities in North America, Europe, and Asia with more than 2000 distributor locations around the world. For more information, visit www.thomsonlinear.com.

Saturday, July 1, 2017

Transportation infrastructure expert to lead FTCH's new Detroit office

Fishbeck, Thompson, Carr & Huber (FTCH), a 60-year-old architectural engineering firm, recently announced the addition of Regine Beauboeuf as director of client services and office lead for the firm's newest location in the city of Detroit. "We are excited to welcome Regine, especially as we continue to grow in Southeast Michigan," says Kamran Qadeer, FTCH senior vice president and principal. "She brings significant transportation infrastructure experience to our operations, tightening our focus on the region's increasingly complex needs as it grows  and changes."

Beauboeuf, a civil engineer with 33 years of large transportation project experience in the United States and Canada, recently joined FTCH after spending 13 years at global engineering and construction firm Parsons as vice president and board member of Parsons Transportation Group of Michigan. During her tenure, she served as project manager for the development of the Detroit River International Crossing. "I'm thrilled to be part of FTCH's expansion to Detroit to continue the firm's tradition of striking a safe and healthy balance between the environment and the region's rapidly modernizing and multifaceted infrastructure," she says.

The FTCH Detroit location, one of nine offices in Michigan, Indiana and Ohio, is slated to officially open later this summer. Four additional engineers and scientists across various disciplines, along with support staff, are expected to be hired. The new office will plan, execute and oversee design, engineering, construction, and environmental sustainability projects for Detroit-based clientele.

Current projects led by the Detroit office include a study for rainwater harvesting and reuse at a major football stadium and replacement of Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard over The Lodge (M-10), along with associated improvements such as extending the ramp north of The Lodge to Grand River Avenue (M-5). The Lodge project, including traffic signal replacement, signage upgrades, and total rehabilitation of Grand River Avenue from Cass Avenue to I-94, will significantly improve traffic flow in anticipation of increased vehicle traffic volume near the new stadium district. Just north of Detroit, FTCH recently employed nontraditional measures to rehabilitate the deteriorating Caddell Drain in the cities of Farmington and Farmington Hills to protect drinking water, property, and infrastructure.

Beauboeuf's extensive background includes 16 years as supervising engineer of the project development section for the Michigan Department of Transportation, managing a $3 billion budget with responsibility for all capacity improvements and new road projects for the State of Michigan. In this role, she oversaw development, budgeting, and scheduling of roadside programs, including major transportation projects, rest areas, and visitor welcome centers, landscapes, wetland mitigation sites, and noise abatement initiatives.

Former Michigan Gov. Jennifer Granholm appointed Beauboeuf, a registered Professional Engineer (PE), in 2004 to the Michigan Board of Professional Surveyors and the Michigan Board of Professional Engineers, serving as board chair. Beauboeuf currently serves on transportation and business management committees for the American Council of Engineering Companies and as secretary of the Michigan chapter of the Conference of Minority Transportation Officials (COMTO). Beauboeuf holds a Bachelor's degree in civil engineering and architecture from the University of Haiti and an MBA from Davenport University. She speaks French and Kreyol.

FTCH, a professional consulting firm with 400 team members in nine offices, provides engineering, environmental sciences, architecture, and construction management services through an integrated project approach for municipalities, universities, major retailers, transportation departments, and manufacturers. Team members consist of engineers, environmental scientists, architects, and construction professionals. For more information, visit www.FTCH.com.

Sunday, June 25, 2017

TradeMachines examines the lack of women in engineering

TradeMachines is a search engine for used industrial machinery. Although we personally never see or have contact with the machines listed on our website, machines of all sorts define our everyday tasks. We talk about, look at, and think about machines every single day.

Given our company profile, our international customer base consists of professionals working with heavy equipment, countless of them being engineers just like one of our company founders. It makes sense: who would build a business model around industrial machines if not someone who has a deep knowledge of them? The longer we have been in business, though, the more we see that we work with a large number of engineers and, interestingly, our clients are mostly men. And looking at the statistics, our observation was valid: within the United States, only 13 percent of engineers are women, while in Germany it's 17 percent and France 21 percent, as just a few examples.

Our company is keen on equality, as our  people come from all over the world. Some of our colleagues are German, some are from the United States, and others are from Poland or Uzbekistan, and the ratio of men to women is currently about 60:40. For us, being given the same chance no matter your background is a main value. Considering that engineering has great prospects and guarantees a stable income almost anywhere in the world, we became curious why women are so severely under-represented in this field. Are they just not interested in what engineering has to offer?

We started researching and realized that the answer is a definite “no” and found the reasoning very intriguing and concerning. We decided that the least we can do as a company is summarize our findings in an infographic to underline the difficulties women face when entering the male-dominated field of engineering, hoping we can also trigger further support from others.

Take a look at our infographic yourself, you might be surprised...



Friday, June 16, 2017

Merrick & Company recognized for hydrothermal processing pilot system

Merrick & Company was recognized at the American Council of Engineering Companies (ACEC) annual Engineering Excellence Awards (EEA) gala in Washington, D.C., which honors the year's most outstanding engineering accomplishments. Merrick received a National Honor Award in the energy category for its hydrothermal processing pilot system (HPPS) project, Oil in Hours, Not Millions of Years.

Genifuel Corporation obtained the license from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for its technology to transform a mixture of 20 percent algae and 80 percent water into bio-crude oil and natural gas. PNNL had proven their process at a lab scale, but Genifuel wanted to build a significantly larger (20 times the previous size) pilot system. Merrick provided lump sum turnkey services for this first-of-its-kind application that included engineering, hazard assessment, cost estimating, procurement, fabrication/assembly oversight, and commissioning.

The HPPS is an innovation that converts something as common as algae into transportation fuel. The system was designed using algae as the biomass feedstock, but almost any biosolid mixed in a slurry can be used. This opens the possibility to take hydrocarbon rich waste from other processes such as agricultural, food processing, or wastewater systems and turn that waste into a usable fuel. Since no solvents or chemicals are used, there is no need to then sequester the solvent or chemical at the end of the process. The use of biomass-produced fuel causes no net increase in greenhouse gases and produces clear, sterile water as a byproduct.

Project winners at the state level EEA competitions were eligible for ACEC’s national EEA competition. A panel of judges representing industry, government, academia, and media rated winning work on the following criteria:
Uniqueness and innovative applications
Future value to the engineering profession and perception by the public
Social, economic, and sustainable development considerations
Complexity
Successful fulfillment of client/owner’s needs

Merrick & Company, an engineering, architecture, design-build, surveying, planning, and geospatial solutions firm, serves domestic and international clients in the energy and chemicals, national security, life sciences, and sustainable infrastructure markets. The employee-owned company maintains twenty offices in the United States, Canada, Mexico, and the United Kingdom. For more information, visit www.merrick.com.

Friday, June 9, 2017

CollegeChoice.net ranks the 20 Most Affordable Online Bachelors in Engineering Degrees

College Choice, an authority in college and university rankings and resources, has published its ranking of the 20 Most Affordable Online Bachelors in Engineering Degrees for 2017.
You can see it at http://www.collegechoice.net/rankings/cheapest-online-engineering-degrees/

The United States' transition to a knowledge-based economy and its increased emphasis on STEM subjects (science, technology, engineering, and math) means lots of opportunities for engineers. As a result, many engineering programs are impacted, and online engineering programs are seen as offering a valuable path to students interested in the field.

"The days when an online degree meant dubious respectability are well in the past, and an online degree can provide a path to a high quality, affordable education that will be taken seriously by employers," Christian Amondson, managing editor of College Choice, says of the ranking. "Nevertheless, because it is difficult to over-emphasize the importance of proper accreditation, we have made sure that all the schools on this list have regional accreditation, and many programs have further accreditation from some of the main STEM accreditation bodies."

The College Choice ranking is based on out-of-state per-credit tuition. Schools may charge additional fees not taken into consideration in this ranking. There may also be face-to-face or lab requirements that necessitate travel.

The ranking for the 20 Most Affordable Online Bachelor's Degrees in Engineering for 2017 finds the American Public University System in the top spot. Kennesaw State University is in second, and University of Southern Mississippi rounds out the top three. The entire ranking in alphabetical order:

American Public University
Bemidji State University
Brigham Young University - Idaho
Daytona State College
Eastern Kentucky University
Eastern New Mexico University
Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University
Excelsior College
Indiana State University
Kennesaw State University
Morgan State University
National University
Old Dominion University
Southern Illinois University - Carbondale
Thomas Edison State University
Trine University
University of Alabama
University of Massachusetts Lowell
University of Southern Mississippi
Western Carolina University

College Choice is an online publication dedicated to helping students and their families find the right college. The site publishes rankings and reviews that make finding the best colleges for different interests easier and more fun. They also publish resources to help students get into, pay for, and thrive at the college of their choice.

Saturday, June 3, 2017

John Pfisterer named senior VP at M&J Engineering


John Pfisterer has been named a senior vice president at M&J Engineering, PC (M&J). He comes to M&J following a distinguished career of over 20 years with MTA Bridges and Tunnels (MTAB&T), culminating as the deputy director of electrical, mechanical, and commissioning groups at the agency’s headquarters. During his tenure at MTAB&T, he also served as the facility engineer at the Queens Midtown Tunnel, where he oversaw both the capital and major maintenance programs.
Pfisterer directed efforts on groundbreaking new technologies including the introduction of EZ Pass, LED lighting, fiber optics, and in-tunnel wireless communications. He also was involved in the agency’s recovery efforts after the 9/11 attack and Superstorm Sandy.

As part of the restoration efforts after Superstorm Sandy, Pfisterer managed the $270 million rehabilitation of the tunnel walls, roadways, and Manhattan Exit Plaza. Other complex assignments under his management at the Queens Midtown Tunnel included the comprehensive facility-wide electrical upgrade and ventilation buildings switchgear and motor control center replacement and the exhaust fan replacement.

Prior to his MTAB&T career, Pfisterer was employed at Burns and Roe Enterprises, where he worked on a wide range or projects including weapons decommissioning and satellite transmission systems (STS) as a systems engineer. Pfisterer holds a bachelor of engineering degree from Pratt Institute as well as a bachelor of science degree from St. John’s University.

“We are thrilled to have John as part of our team” said Maqsood Malik, M&J’s President and CEO. “His extensive knowledge of tunnel systems and project management will contribute greatly to M&J’s continued growth and capabilities in these vital areas, particularly throughout the New York metropolitan area.”

M&J Engineering is a certified minority (MBE), disadvantaged (DBE), and small business (SBE) enterprise as well as a multi-disciplinary consulting engineering firm with over 100 employees.  Since its founding in 2004, M&J has grown into a provider of design, environmental, construction management/inspection, naval architecture, aerospace engineering, and technology services to a range of clients including federal, state, city/local agencies, private owners, architects, other engineers, and contractors. With offices in NY; NJ; CT; PA; FL; VA; and Washington, DC, the firm currently is the prime contractor for the $236 million Construction Management and Resident Engineering/Inspection of the MTA’s Queens Midtown Tunnel.

Saturday, May 27, 2017

FSU’s High-Performance Materials Institute to play major role in deep space exploration

Florida State University’s High-Performance Materials Institute (HPMI) and the Florida A&M University–Florida State University (FAMU-FSU) College of Engineering are joining a major multi-university project funded by NASA that will focus on developing technologies crucial to human exploration in deep space.

“We are really happy to participate in a project that supports NASA and its future work,” HPMI Director Richard Liang says. Vice President for Research Gary Ostrander adds, “This is a wonderful opportunity for our faculty researchers and students to participate in a project that pushes the boundaries of science and will have a major impact on space travel and exploration. FSU’s High-Performance Materials Institute was designed to explore the possibilities and uses of next-generation materials, and this project will allow them to apply their expertise in an exciting way.”

The work is part of an overall initiative from NASA to create the first-ever Space Technology Research Institutes (STRI), including one on biological engineering in space and one on next-generational materials. Each institute will receive $15 million over a five-year period that will be distributed among the partner universities.

HPMI is a multidisciplinary research institute at Florida State University largely staffed by faculty from the FAMU-FSU College of Engineering. Both FSU and FAMU will receive funding from the STRI focusing on next-generation materials and manufacturing. The money will help fund multiple graduate students at the FAMU-FSU College of Engineering and one postdoctoral researcher.

“The High-Performance Materials Institute is a leader in developing advanced nanocomposites and additive manufacturing that will be critical for man’s extended presence in deep space,” FAMU-FSU College of Engineering Dean J. Murray Gibson says. “Because of this grant, our students will have unique opportunities to participate in an exciting future major space program.”

Also a professor at the FAMU-FSU College of Engineering, Liang will serve as principle investigator at the college and an area leader for the STRI. Six faculty from the FAMU-FSU College of Engineering will participate in the project. The STRI will be led by Professor Gregory Odegard at Michigan Technological University.

At HPMI and the FAMU-FSU College of Engineering, scientists will specifically work on the development of carbon nanotube-based structural materials that can help create next-generation space vehicles, power systems, and potentially even habitats. “It’s exciting to know that I could have a student who could get experience here on this project and then potentially work on the mission to Mars in the future,” says Tarik Dickens, an assistant professor at the FAMU-FSU College of Engineering who is also working on the project.

HPMI’s mission is to develop next-generation materials that can be used in a variety of technologies and industries. It has been designated as an Industry/University Cooperative Research Center by the National Science Foundation and as a Center of Excellence by Florida’s public university governing body, the Florida Board of Governors.

The other universities participating in the project are the University of Utah, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Johns Hopkins University, Georgia Institute of Technology, University of Minnesota, Pennsylvania State University, University of Colorado, and Virginia Commonwealth University. Industrial partners include Nanocomp Technologies and Solvay, with the U.S. Air Force Research Lab as a collaborator.

Sunday, May 7, 2017

McMillen Jacobs Associates names regional manager and construction management practice lead



J
ohn Kaplin, CCM, has stepped into the position of California regional manager. The region includes offices in San Francisco, Walnut Creek, Pasadena, and San Diego. Kaplin has been with McMillen Jacobs for three years, most recently serving as the firm’s construction management (CM) practice lead. He has 30 years of experience in geotechnical investigations, design management, and construction management of underground and heavy civil projects. He has worked in leadership positions on projects with a wide variety of delivery methods including design-build and CM at Risk. Kaplin holds an M.S. in Engineering Geology and a B.S. in Geology from Colorado State University.
Sarah Wilson, PE, CCM has assumed the construction management practice lead position. She currently serves as resident engineer on the Central Subway project in San Francisco. Wilson is a senior associate and has been with McMillen Jacobs Associates for 17 years. She has served in project management roles on a wide variety of underground construction projects from planning through design and construction. She has focused on construction management roles for the last 12 years. In her new role, she will provide day-to-day support for CM staff, overall leadership to the CM practice on operational matters for existing projects, and collaboration with senior management on development of new business and talent for our construction management projects. Wilson received an M.S. in Geotechnical Engineering from UC Berkeley and a B.S. in Civil Engineering from Drexel University.
Based in Seattle, WA, McMillen Jacobs Associates is an employee-owned environmental, engineering, and construction company providing an array of technical services to the heavy civil, underground, and water resources markets. The firm has offices on the U.S. west and east coasts as well as in New Zealand, Australia, and British Columbia, Canada. For more information, visit www.mcmjac.com.


Friday, April 28, 2017

NC State and UNC biomedical engineers develop paper pumps

A hydraulic battery pumping fluid through a simple microchannel

Biomedical engineering researchers from North Carolina State University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill have developed inexpensive paper pumps that use capillary action to power portable microfluidic devices, opening the door to a range of biomedical tools. Microfluidic devices manipulate fluids that have a volume of one microliter or less – substantially smaller than a single teardrop. These devices hold promise for use in applications ranging from biomedical diagnostic tools to drug testing technologies.
“One longstanding challenge to the development of portable, real-world microfluidic device technologies has been the need to find a cost-effective way to pump fluids through the device when outside the lab,” says Glenn Walker, co-corresponding author of a journal article on the work and an associate professor in the joint biomedical engineering program at NC State and UNC. “Portability is important because it makes new applications possible, such as diagnostic tools that can be used in the field. Electric pumps, and tubing to connect them, are fine for a laboratory environment, but those aren’t easy to take with you.”
Now Walker and his collaborators have developed a new way to not only pump fluids through microfluidic devices, but to exert substantial control over that flow. They can stop and re-start the flow, control the rate of the flow, and control how long the flow lasts. “And, because our approach is a new twist on an age-old technology, our pumps are extremely cost effective,” Walker says.
The age-old technology he’s referring to is paper. The researchers call their pumping system a hydraulic battery, but it doesn’t involve electricity in any way. Instead, the battery draws its pumping power from capillary action.
If you’ve ever seen a paper towel soak up a spill, you’ve seen capillary action at work. Broadly speaking, capillary action is the tendency of liquids to be drawn into small spaces by surface tension. In the context of the hydraulic battery, it is the tendency of water – and aqueous liquids, such as blood – to be drawn into the pores found in a piece of paper.
“Our system uses pieces of paper 125 microns thick, little more than the width of a single hair,” Walker says. “Capillary action pulls a liquid into the paper. And by changing the shape of the paper, we are able to control how much liquid is pulled through an attached device – and how quickly that happens.” The shape can be changed in two dimensions by simply cutting out the paper. But it can also be manipulated in three dimensions by stacking multiple pumps on top of each other. “By stacking the paper we are able to create more complex flow profiles, depending on the needs for any given application,” Walker says. “And any one of these hydraulic battery pumps costs less than a dime.”
There are other portable means for pumping liquid through a microfluidic device, but Walker feels that the paper pumps his team has developed hold several significant advantages. “Our hydraulic battery is small, lightweight, very inexpensive, easy to connect to a device and disposable,” Walker says. “In addition, our paper pumps could be saved for later evaluation, such as to run secondary, lab-based tests to confirm on-site diagnoses.”
The researchers have filed a patent application on the paper pump technology and are currently looking for industry partners to help bring it to the marketplace. “We’re optimistic that it could make a difference in both public health and advancing fundamental research,” Walker says.
The paper, “Modular pumps as programmable hydraulic batteries for microfluidic devices,” is published in the journal Technology. Lead author of the paper is Brian Cummins, a former postdoctoral researcher in the joint biomedical engineering program. Co-corresponding author of the paper is Frances Ligler, Lampe Distinguished Professor of Biomedical Engineering at NC State and UNC. The paper was co-authored by Rukesh Chinthapatla and Balaji Lenin, both of whom are undergraduates at NC State. The work was done with support from the NC State University Chancellor’s Innovation Fund.

Saturday, April 22, 2017

POWER Engineers works to bring more reliable power to southern Kansas

Construction of new transmission lines and substations by Wheatland Electric Cooperative will allow the delivery of more reliable power to southern Kansas homes and businesses. POWER Engineers (POWER) is providing Wheatland Electric the engineering design and other services to seamlessly coordinate work on two transmission and four substation projects needed to significantly improve system reliability.

The work at Wheatland Electric is being done in conjunction with major transmission upgrades by Mid-Kansas Electric Company in the same area and includes new 138-kilovolt (kV) lines in the areas of Caldwell and Conway Springs. It also includes construction of new substations at Caldwell, Conway Springs, and Rago. A fourth substation at Bluff City will get upgrades to accommodate the new 138-kV line.

“The new 138-kV lines will provide a much more reliable source than the existing lines and will better support present and future power demands,” says Brian Tomlinson, POWER’s project manager for the work at Wheatland Electric. “The new lines, along with Mid-Kansas transmission additions, will give local distribution substations two paths to deliver electricity, providing Wheatland Electric more flexibility for restoring power during an outage, such as during a storm, thereby improving reliability.” The higher voltage lines also allow industry to consider building in areas that previously could not support their needs for electricity.

Besides engineering design, POWER’s services for the projects include support for procuring materials, putting together construction contracts, issuing construction documents to contractors, evaluating bids, recommending contract awards, holding pre-construction meetings, and more. The majority of the power projects are expected to be completed by the end of 2017.

POWER Engineers is a global consulting engineering firm specializing in the delivery of integrated solutions for energy, food and beverage facilities, communications, environmental, and federal markets. POWER Engineers offers complete multidisciplinary engineering and program management services. Founded in 1976, it is an employee-owned company with more than 2,100 employees and over 45 offices throughout the United States and abroad.

Saturday, April 15, 2017

Missouri S&T researchers develop ways to improve machining processes


Fixing flaws introduced during the machining of large components used in the aircraft and heavy equipment industries can be time-consuming for manufacturers and costly if they must scrap the flawed parts after they’ve been fabricated. A new approach developed by researchers at Missouri University of Science and Technology is helping manufacturers eliminate those flaws before the parts are created.

Writing in the February 2017 issue of the Journal of Manufacturing Science and Engineering (JSME), the Missouri S&T researchers describe an approach that can greatly improve the accuracy of five-axis machine tools used to fabricate large parts. Five-axis machine tools are computer-numerically controlled (CNC) machines that can move, cut, or mill a part on five different axes at the same time. This allows manufacturers to create complex contours or curves when creating a large part such as an aircraft wing.

“Five-axis machine tools are known to have 41 basic geometric errors,” says Jennifer Creamer, a Ph.D. student in mechanical engineering at Missouri S&T and the lead author of the JMSE paper. As Dr. Robert Landers, professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering and a co-author of the paper, puts it, “The way you want the machine to move when making a large part is different than the way it actually moves due to inherent geometric errors.” Because of these errors, manufacturers must make adjustments in calibrating their CNC machines.

Several different approaches exist to help compensate for those errors, but none of them provides a complete picture, Creamer says. Manufacturers must combine various methods to get the best sense of a milling problem. The result, she says, is “a piecemeal approach that makes calibration a time-consuming and expensive process." In her research, Creamer set out to find a way to eliminate that piecemeal approach and develop a new model for capturing complicated geometric errors while also automatically generating compensation tables for those errors. A compensation table is a kind of map of errors that can be programmed into a CNC machine to reduce errors.

Flaws in the fabrication of large parts may seem insignificant given the large size of the parts, but they can cause problems. Parts for airplanes, for example, can be 120 feet long, and their size can make holding tight tolerances problematic, Landers says. In Creamer’s research on five-axis machine tools, “She’s trying to hold errors to five thousandths of an inch over 120 feet,” he says.

In collaboration with colleagues at Boeing Research and Technology in St. Louis, where she works as an engineer, Creamer used a laser tracker to quickly measure the motion of all axes over the entire workspace of an industrial five-axis machine. Based on these measurements, she generated a set of compensating tables that could be used to improve the accuracy on a variety of machine tools and related platforms.

Creamer’s paper, titled “Table-Based Volumetric Error Compensation of Large Five-Axis Machine Tools," was originally published online in September 2016 (https://manufacturingscience.asmedigitalcollection.asme.org/article.aspx?articleID=2543543). Co-authors with Creamer are Landers; Dr. Patrick Sammons, who earned his Ph.D. from Missouri S&T in 2016 and is now a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Michigan; Dr. Douglas Bristow, associate professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering at Missouri S&T; Dr. Philip Freeman, senior technical fellow at Boeing; and Samuel Easley, an engineer at Boeing. The research is supported by Missouri S&T, the Boeing Company, and Missouri S&T’s Center for Aerospace Manufacturing Technologies.

Creamer is also supported through a GAANN Fellowship at Missouri S&T. GAANN (Graduate Assistance in Areas of National Need) is a U.S. Department of Education program designed to encourage more graduate-level education in areas of national need.

Friday, April 7, 2017

Thornton Tomasetti acquires Swallow Acoustic Consultants

Thornton Tomasetti, an international engineering firm, has acquired Swallow Acoustic Consultants Limited (SACL), a specialist in acoustics, noise, and vibration control engineering based in Mississauga, Ontario, Canada. The addition of Swallow bolsters Thornton Tomasetti's Structural Engineering and Forensics practices as well as its Canadian presence.

Founded in the early 1990s by John Swallow, SACL offers a broad range of services in acoustics design and forensics and noise and vibration analysis and control. These include architectural acoustics; environmental, industrial and mechanical noise control; acoustic and vibration testing; expert witness testimony; technical writing and standards; construction vibration assessment; and vibration control.

In addition to its Mississauga headquarters, the 13-person firm has an office in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. John Swallow will become a principal at Thornton Tomasetti, while Ramin Behboudi and Michael Wesolowsky will join as associate principals.

SACL is one of a small number of firms worldwide that designs tuned mass dampers (TMD), a device used to help stabilize buildings against wind sway and other kinds of motion. Its TMD work includes tall buildings and long-span structures such as sports facilities and bridges. SACL's TMD capabilities will dovetail with Thornton Tomasetti's efforts in the field, which includes the development of a fluid harmonic disruptor based on NASA technology.

Starting with Manhattan's LaGuardia School for the Arts in 1988, Thornton Tomasetti has collaborated on many projects with SACL as well as strategic partner Tacet Engineering, whose staff SACL acquired in 2012. These include Chifley Tower in Sydney, Australia; Soldier Field in Chicago, Illinois; Qatar National Convention Centre in Doha; and most recently, T-Mobile Arena in Las Vegas, Nevada, which opened last April. SACL has worked in some 20 countries and has a considerable presence in central and eastern Canada. This will give Thornton Tomasetti a larger footprint in Canada, having opened its first office in the country in Toronto earlier this year.

According to Thomas Scarangello, chairman and CEO of Thornton Tomasetti, "For nearly 30 years, Swallow has been our go-to partner for vibration issues. Through our close collaboration on many diverse projects, we have built a strong working relationship." John Swallow, president and founder of Swallow Acoustic Consultants, adds, "Teaming with Thornton Tomasetti will allow us to serve current and future clients in new and innovative ways. We look forward to sharing our considerable experience in the acoustics, noise, and vibration control fields with Thornton Tomasetti's professionals."

Thornton Tomasetti is involved in engineering design, investigation, and analysis, serving clients worldwide on projects of all sizes and complexity. Through its 10 complementary practices, Thornton Tomasetti addresses the full life cycle of a structure. They have supported clients working in more than 50 countries, with projects that include the tallest buildings and longest spans to the restoration of prized historic properties. Thornton Tomasetti consists of more than 1,200 engineering, architecture, sustainability, and support professionals that collaborate from offices across North America, Asia-Pacific, Europe, Latin America, and the Middle East.

Friday, March 31, 2017

Katharine Morgan becomes president of ASTM International

Katharine “Kathie” Morgan recently began serving as president of ASTM International, one of the world’s largest standards development organizations. Morgan will lead a team that supports thousands of members, customers, partners, and other stakeholders worldwide. She succeeds James Thomas, who served in the role for 25 years.

“I am thrilled and humbled to serve as president of an organization that has played such a foundational role in meeting societal needs for over a century,” Morgan said at the organization’s first major meeting of 2017 in Norfolk, VA.  “We will build on the legacy of Jim Thomas, attracting even more of the world’s top technical experts to our committees while also serving people and organizations that rely on our standards and services.”

Morgan was joined at the event by Thomas Marsh, CEO of Centrotrade and ASTM International’s 2017 chairman of the board. “Kathie brings proven leadership skills, a deep understanding of the global standards community, a passion for ASTM International’s mission, and much more,” Marsh said. “ASTM International will continue to grow and thrive under her leadership.”

Also, Morgan visited the Virginia Beach Fire Department Training Facility to see demonstrations of emergency response robots and drones.  Manufacturers, first responders, and others tested robot capabilities and operator proficiency using 50 test methods, many of which have been developed through ASTM International’s Committee on Homeland Security Applications (E54).

Morgan is a 33-year veteran of ASTM International. She served as executive vice president for the past two years. Prior to that, she was vice president of Technical Committee Operations, leading a 50-member team that supports the volunteer work of ASTM International’s 30,000 members worldwide.

Morgan is one of the world’s most prominent voices on standardization-related issues. She is a board member of the American National Standards Institute’s Board of Directors, the Council of Engineering and Scientific Executives, the International Consumer Product Health and Safety Organization, the Society for Standards Professionals (SES), the American Society of Association Executives, and a former member of the Standards Council of Canada’s Standards Development Organization Advisory Committee.

Morgan holds a bachelor’s degree in chemical engineering from Lafayette College in Easton, PA and a master’s degree in business administration from Widener University in Chester, PA. Follow her on Twitter at @ASTMpres.